Winter Herping

Prior to this winter, I never bothered to look for herps from about late October until maybe early March when the Spring Peepers started calling. Then late last year I had the sudden realization that a lot of salamanders probably aren’t hiding in subterranean lairs awaiting Spring. No, they’re hanging out in the creeks!

My office was closed for Inauguration Day, so on January 20 I visited a local river and a nature area in hopes of turning up some salamanders. The river yielded a Northern Two-lined Salamander beneath the first rock! I spent another 20 minutes poking around trying to find a bit more diversity, but all I found were more Northern Two-lined Salamanders. A young Northern Dusky Salamander eventually slid through my fingers at the edge of the river, but I declined to try and relocate it for a photo.

This Northern Two-lined Salamander was my first herp of 2017!

This Northern Two-lined Salamander was my first herp of 2017!

Tiring of not finding much, even though it was late January, I decided to visit a nearby location that holds breeding Spotted Salamanders. I found them in mid-March last year, so I was curious as to how early they might turn up at the breeding pond. Turns out they don’t show up in late January (or mid-February, for that matter).

Several Eastern Red-backed Salamanders kept me from getting skunked at the second area. Bless their hearts, they’re out in the woods beneath just a bit of cover every day of the year.

Eastern Red-backed Salamanders are incredibly abundant around here. I seldom return from trips where I managed to keep a count of every individual I encountered.

Eastern Red-backed Salamanders are incredibly abundant around here. I seldom return from trips where I managed to keep a count of every individual I encountered.

Just before Valentine’s Day Diana and Owen joined me on a hike to look for Spotted Salamanders with our friends Kate and Adrianna. The Spotted Salamanders did not show (the Eastern Red-backs did though!). We spent a lot of time hiking in a chilly rain to not find much, but I managed to corral a little Pickerel Frog just before it was time to turn back to the warmth of our cars.

The two adults in this photo tried to keep the two children in this photo out of the mud while I tried to find critters.

The two adults in this photo tried to keep the two children in this photo out of the mud while I tried to find critters.

Owen wants to hold all of the Eastern Red-backed Salamanders that we find.

Owen wants to hold all of the Eastern Red-backed Salamanders that we find.

The savior of a wet, chilly failed Spotted Salamander search was this Pickerel Frog.

The savior of a wet, chilly failed Spotted Salamander search was this Pickerel Frog.

Owen has been watching a lot of Coyote Peterson lately, and that’s spurred him to want to find “critters” and “creatures” with me whenever he gets the chance. On President’s Day weekend we went to a nearby trail and spent some time looking for salamanders together. He was always ready to check the next rock or log! We found several Eastern Red-backed Salamanders, including at least two with eggs!

An Eastern Red-backed Salamander with her (?) eggs.

An Eastern Red-backed Salamander with her (?) eggs.

Fresh off of finding several Northern Two-lined Salamanders!

Fresh off of finding several Northern Two-lined Salamanders!

When Diana asked me what I wanted for my birthday this year I told her I wanted an overnight trip to look for herps. She graciously agreed (look for a blog or two about a trip to North Carolina in late April/early May!), and on my actual birthday I got to head down to the river near our house to see what I could turn up!

I immediately found Northern Two-lined Salamanders everywhere I looked. The weather has been unusually warm (and relatively wet) the past month, so cold-blooded animals seem to be stirring more than I’d expect them to be during a normal year.

I opted to bypass most of my usual searching grounds in hopes of finding some runs or holes in the river that might produce some new fish species later this year. That turned out to be an excellent decision! For some reason, I decided to check under a rock I normally wouldn’t look under. It was big, bulky, not really in (or touching) the river. It ended up being a fantastic decision!

Once all the detritus I stirred up from lifting the rock subsided I was left looking at a stunning Northern Red Salamander!

Northern Red Salamander in situ after uncovering it.

Northern Red Salamander in situ after uncovering it.

Northern Red Salamander

Northern Red Salamander

The first time I've made use of my new Samyang 8 mm lens! It is a very challenging lens to use, and I have much to learn.

The first time I’ve made use of my new Samyang 8 mm lens! It is a very challenging lens to use, and I have much to learn.

I recently acquired a sheet of white acrylic to try and take some uncluttered field photos of small species I find.

I recently acquired a sheet of white acrylic to try and take some uncluttered field photos of small species I find.

I spent a bit of time photographing the Northern Red Salamander when I discovered a little Pickerel Frog hopping nearby. Normally, I would have probably ignored it after taking a quick photo for Herp Mapper, but something seemed strange about the way it was moving. A close inspection revealed it to be a 3.5-legged frog! It was missing the lower half of its left rear limb!

As there didn't appear to be any scarring, my guess is that this frog was born this way.

As there didn’t appear to be any scarring, my guess is that this frog was born this way.

Notice how there's no left hind foot on this Pickerel Frog.

Notice how there’s no left hind foot on this Pickerel Frog.

As February wraps up I’m surprised to find myself having already seen five amphibians in 2017. I expect Spring Peepers and Gray Tree Frogs to begin calling shortly, plus there are undoubtedly Spotted Salamanders at the breeding pond by now…

I received a snake hook for my birthday from Diana's parents. Owen has pretty much decided that it is his, and he likes to practice wrangling snakes.

I received a snake hook for my birthday from Diana’s parents. Owen has pretty much decided that it’s his, and he likes to practice wrangling snakes.

As always, high quality versions of many of these photos can be seen on my Flickr page.

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